Hear true stories of marine research! In each episode of "Two Sea Fans," Mote Marine Laboratory scientists and their partners have fun and educational conversations with hosts Joe Nickelson and Hayley Rutger, who love communicating marine science to help listeners become more ocean-literate. New episodes are available every two weeks. Download episodes free by searching "Two Sea Fans" in the iTunes store.

All episodes of “Two Sea Fans” are © Mote Marine Laboratory. If you have questions, comments or an interest in featuring "Two Sea Fans" on your website, please contact Hayley (hrutger@mote.org) and Joe (videojoe@mote.org).

She studies sea turtles on the seashore…

She studies sea turtles on the seashore…

The beaches we visit during the day become turtle turf at night. Thousands of loggerhead sea turtles and smaller numbers of other species lay nests with 100-ish eggs apiece during southwest Florida’s yearly nesting season, May 1-Oct. 31. Melissa Bernhard, Senior Biologist with Mote’s Sea Turtle Conservation & Research Program — a friend to reptiles everywhere — leads local sea turtle conservation efforts with hundreds of trained volunteers who love searching for turtle crawls (tracks) at the crack of dawn. In this episode, Melissa tells Hayley and Joe what she’s learned and done through Mote’s state-permitted efforts, including night-time turtle tagging!

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Happy chemist on Sarasota Bay

Happy chemist on Sarasota Bay

Mote Staff Chemist Camia Charniga loves getting out on the ocean and rivers, even in rough weather, to monitor the “health” of the water itself. Water clarity and quality, including nutrient chemistry, have an influence on seagrasses, fish and myriad other wild things we can’t live without. In this episode, Camia tells hosts Joe and Hayley how Mote’s water chemistry data help government institutions meet requirements for cleaner waterways. She also shares stories from the field, about a skittish gator, a curious manatee… and a TROLL under a bridge? It’s not what you think!

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A year’s worth of updates on science, education

A year’s worth of updates on science, education

We ring in 2018 by sharing the latest updates on many Mote projects from 2017. Listeners will learn: how far our tagged sea turtles and sharks traveled in the wild; how we improved systems to detect red tide; why our scientists patented new technology to distinguish male from female fish; how Mote's Florida Keys facility and coral restoration sites fared during Hurricane Irma; how our cold-stunned sea turtle patients are doing after their trip from the New England Aquarium to Mote's Sea Turtle Rehabilitation Hospital; and much more. Hayley shares the updates while Joe is away. Come back, Joe! We miss you!

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Seahorse tales

Seahorse tales

Wild horses couldn't drag us away from this awesome interview! Aquarium Biologist Amanda Hodo shares what it's like to raise and breed seahorses, based on her experience supervising the Seahorse Conservation Lab in Mote Aquarium. Hosts Joe and Hayley love learning how seahorses change color, grab things (and each other) with their prehensile tails, and make babies in a very unusual way. Tune in for serious seahorse smarts... and a bit of horsing around!

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Trash talk

Trash talk

We’ve all heard about trash in the oceans, but how bad is it? Senior Biologist Kim Bassos-Hull shares why marine debris — even tiny bits of plastic — can threaten marine animals and ecosystems, and she offers simple ideas for reducing marine debris in our daily lives. Through years of marine research and youth education programs, Bassos-Hull has a wealth of experience and stories, from untangling and measuring clumps of fishing line found at bridges and piers to encountering the strange case of a dolphin entangled in a bathing suit. Explore marine debris issues further with Mote's exhibit opening Dec. 9, "Sea Debris: Awareness Through Art" featuring the marine trash sculptures of "Washed Ashore": www.mote.org/seadebris. Bassos Hull carries out her work through Mote Marine Laboratory and the Sarasota Dolphin Research Program, a Chicago Zoological Society Program in collaboration with Mote.

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THANK YOU! Thanksgiving greeting from the ‘Two Sea Fans’ hosts

THANK YOU! Thanksgiving greeting from the ‘Two Sea Fans’ hosts

Happy Thanksgiving from "Two Sea Fans" hosts Joe and Hayley! In this special, short segment, the hosts share what they're thankful for, looking back at a great first year of podcast episodes and looking forward to upcoming discussions. In particular, Hayley and Joe are excited to talk about keeping the oceans trash free, as Mote prepares to host the special exhibit "Sea Debris: Awareness through Art" featuring "Washed Ashore," from Dec. 9-June 15 (www.mote.org/seadebris).

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Your digital window to the sea

Your digital window to the sea

Does a “virtual field trip” sound fun? Then dive deeper with Mote’s SeaTrek.TV! This digital learning program led by Kasey Gaylord-Opalewski and Jason Robertshaw uses video chat platforms like Skype and Zoom to share marine science with kids and adults around the world. SeaTrek.TV programs have ranged from live-streaming conversations with a shark scientist at sea to studio-based chats with experts on jellyfish, corals and other marine life, along with glimpses into cool behind-the-scenes spaces such as Mote’s collection of dolphin and whale bones. Listen as Kasey and Jason share their SeaTrek smarts with “Two Sea Fans” hosts Hayley and Joe — who have clearly met their match. Learn more at SeaTrek.TV and check out related teacher professional development programs here.

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Marine biomedical research since 1979

Marine biomedical research since 1979

Photo copyright: Mote Marine Laboratory. Meet a research pioneer with 38 years of history at Mote Marine Laboratory. In 1979, Dr. Carl Luer founded Mote’s Marine Biomedical Research Program, which investigates subjects such as cancer and infection using marine organisms — particularly sharks, stingrays and skates — rather than classic lab animals such as rats or rabbits. Luer arrived a year after Mote moved to its current home on City Island, Sarasota. Back then, the Lab’s second floor was partially complete, the staff comprised fewer than 20 people (compared with more than 200 today) and the campus grounds were wilder — occasional rattlesnakes and all. Tune in as Luer shares his history and scientific advances through teamwork with Mote’s Marine Immunology Program manager, Dr. Cathy Walsh.

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You otter tune in…

You otter tune in…

Can you tell a river otter from a sea otter? Do you know if otters are related more closely to cats or dogs? Do you know what a watershed is, and why it matters to otters? If you answered no to any of these questions, or you simply want to learn more about otters in the wild and at Mote Aquarium, then join hosts Hayley and Joe as they interview Amanda Foltz, Senior Aquarium Biologist for otters at Mote. Mote Aquarium houses three orphaned otters in its exhibit "Otters & Their Waters" (www.mote.org/otters).

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