Podcast: Toxic topics, beneficial research

Marine ecotoxicologists investigate some of the toughest challenges we must overcome to protect the ocean—in particular, how toxic substances harm marine animals and the ecosystem. Today we meet Dr. Aileen Maldonado, a Mote Postdoctoral Research Fellow who studies natural toxins and human-produced toxicants in the marine environment. In this episode, Dr. Maldonado gives hosts Joe and Hayley insight into toxic substances that concern scientists, environmental regulators and communities, and she discusses her Mote research focused on mitigation of the toxin-producing Florida red tide and on improving methods to assess the health of corals at risk from pollution and many other stressors.

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Mote educator tapped to lead education committee for marine laboratories nationwide

Aly Busse, Assistant Vice President for Education at Mote, has been named Chair of the National Association of Marine Laboratories’ (NAML’s) new Education Committee—a prominent leadership role and exciting opportunity to for Mote to spearhead improved strategies for educational excellence at marine science nonprofits across the nation.

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Podcast: Aquaculture in a fish-eat-fish world

In nature, many fish eat other fish—and some naturally engage in cannibalism, eating members of their own species. However, fish farming (aquaculture) operations strive to reduce that behavior and aim to raise as many healthy fish as possible to meet important needs for sustainable seafood and environmental restoration. Common snook, a Florida sportfish raised by Mote Marine Laboratory to enhance wild fisheries, are capable of snacking on their fellow snook as they grow up in aquaculture systems. Mote Postdoctoral Scientist Dr. Flavio Ribeiro is studying how to curb this behavior by investigating its biology and environmental causes. In this episode, Dr. Ribeiro tells hosts Hayley and Joe about tackling cannibalism, also known as "intraspecific prediation," during his career with multiple aquaculture-raised species.

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